OUR HOUSE

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From an internationally acclaimed author, a disturbing and addictive novel of domestic suspense where secrets kept hidden from spouses cause shocking surprises that hit home…

There’s nothing unusual about a new family moving in at 91 Trinity Avenue. Except it’s her house. And she didn’t sell it.

When Fiona Lawson comes home to find strangers moving into her house, she’s sure there’s been a mistake. She and her estranged husband, Bram, have a modern coparenting arrangement: bird’s nest custody, where each parent spends a few nights a week with their two sons at the prized family home to maintain stability for their children. But the system built to protect their family ends up putting them in terrible jeopardy. In a domino effect of crimes and misdemeanors, the nest comes tumbling down.

Now Bram has disappeared and so have Fiona’s children. As events spiral well beyond her control, Fiona will discover just how many lies her husband was weaving and how little they truly knew each other. But Bram’s not the only one with things to hide, and some secrets are best kept to oneself, safe as houses.

AMAZON | GOODREADS | AUTHOR’S WEBSITE

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“I suppose the point I’m trying to make is that it’s hard sometimes to tell the difference between weakness and strength. Between hero and villain.”

Louise Candlish delivers an entertaining and refreshing novel about love, deceit, and the chilling length someone’s willing to go to avoid trouble.

Fiona and Bram Lawson are newly separated after Bram’s infidelity. They have two children and in trying to keep some kind of stability for them, Fiona comes up with a bird’s nest custody agreement. The boys will stay in the family home, and Fi and Bram will take turns living there with them.

Their agreement seems to be working beautifully, until Fiona comes home early one day and discovers another family moving into the home. Bram and their children are no where to be found.

The way the book is written is unlike anything I’ve ever read. It’s told in alternating POV’s.  Fiona’s in the form of a podcast called THE VICTIM, and Bram’s in the form of a Word Document. I think how the author used these two devices for the story was brilliant. Very original and engaging.

So now to the plot. For me, the first hundred pages and the last hundred pages were the best. In the middle I found the story to be a bit stagnant and honesty, at times, found myself rolling my eyes… A LOT! It starts with Fiona finding Bram sleeping with a neighbor in their children’s playhouse. She basically throws him out. Good. I’m all for it. This wasn’t his first time and obviously things aren’t going to change. But after their separation there’s an accumulation of mistakes on Bram’s part. Mistakes that could have been avoided if he’d just be honest with Fiona. But, Fiona is NOT an easy person to be honest with. She’s judgmental and at times has an air of superiority over Bram. I understand why he’d want to hide things from her. It was just so frustrating reading at times. I saw the disaster coming but there was nothing I could do to help prevent it.

The last 100 pages were my favorite. So, SO many twists and turns I didn’t see coming. I could have never predicted the last two sentences. Looking back I should have, but I was so enveloped in the story it completely slipped my mind how it could all play out.

Please do yourself a favor and pick up OUR HOUSE. Even with the slow middle, Louise Chandlish made up for it with her professional writting and imaginative storytelling. This is one you don’t want to miss.

4/5 STARS

*THANK YOU TO BERKLEY FOR PROVIDING ME WITH THIS FREE REVIEW COPY.
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